For over four decades, Loretta Lynn has fashioned a body of work as artistically and commercially successful-and as culturally significant-as any female performer you’d care to name. Her music has confronted many of the major social issues of her time, and her life story is a rags-to-riches tale familiar to pop, rock and country fans alike. The Coal Miner’s Daughter-the tag refers to a hit single, an album, a best-selling autobiography, an Oscar-winning film, and to Lynn herself-has journeyed from the poverty of the Kentucky hills to Nashville superstardom to her current status as an American icon.

Loretta was born in Butcher Holler, Kentucky. Just as she would later sing in “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” Loretta’s family eked out a living during the Depression on the “poor man’s dollar” her father managed to earn “work[ing] all night in the Van Lear coal mine [and] all day long in the field a-hoein’ corn.” As she also notes in that song, “I never thought of leavin’ Butcher Holler.” But that was before she met Oliver Lynn (aka Doolittle or Doo or “Mooney” for moonshine), a handsome 21-year-old fresh from the service who swept the young Loretta Webb off her feet. The couple married when Loretta was barely 14.

Looking for a future that didn’t require him to work the mines, Doo found work in Custer, Washington, and Loretta joined him in 1951. The following decade found Lynn a fulltime mother. In her spare time, though, with Doo’s encouragement, she learned to play the guitar and began singing in the area. During one televised talent contest in Tacoma, hosted by Buck Owens, Loretta was spotted by Norm Burley who…

More »

Discography Highlights

COAL MINER’S DAUGHTER Loretta Lynn
Sure Fire Music Company, Inc.

DON’T COME HOME A DRINKIN’ WITH LOVIN’ ON YOUR MIND Peggy Sue Wells, Loretta Lynn
Sure Fire Music Company, Inc.

View Full Song ListView Full Song List