Songwriters Friends



In the world of popular music, yesterday's idol is very often tomorrow's forgotten name. Only a handful of performers have demonstrated the lasting appeal it takes to weather the onslaught of fads and changing trends over the years, and Frankie Laine is a classic example. His impeccable musicianship and taste have kept him an international favorite for over four decades.

Ever since his recording of "That's My Desire" burst onto the scene like a musical firework in 1947, praise has poured in from all corners, from young and old alike, for this gifted and versatile artist. Today, 21 Gold Records later, Frankie Laine has become a musical tradition. He is in constant demand for top nightclub engagements, both here and in Europe.

Laine's magical appeal, however, far transcends mere nostalgia. His recording of "You Gave Me a Mountain," a song written especially for Laine by his good friend, Marty Robbins, went gold in the early 1970's, a time by which many of his contemporaries had long since quieted down. Laine continues to record exciting new material while maintaining a healthy respect for the songs, like "Mule Train," "That Lucky Old Sun," "I Believe," and "Jezebel," which all his longtime admirers know by heart. Many of these tunes were collected into an album entitled "The World of Frankie Laine," that topped the charts in England in 1982. Since then, this album has been issued in 43 different countries.

Not too shabby for a humble Sicilian kid, born to immigrant parents in the heart of Chicago's Little Italy on March 30, 1913. Laine first sang in public as part of the choir at the Church of the Immaculate Conception. His love of music led him to Chicago's Merry Garden Ballroom, where friends frequently urged him up onto the bandstand to perform a number or two.

At the age of 17, Laine left home to try his luck as a marathon dancer. This fad of the depression years was a tough way of keeping body and soul together, but Laine stuck with it and eventually he and a partner, Ruth Smith, met the all-time marathon dance record in Atlantic City, New Jersey. They danced for a total of 3,501 hours over 145 consecutive days, and split a grand prize of $1,000 for their efforts.

When Frankie decided to make his living with his voice instead of his feet, the road to success proved long and hard. It led him up and down the Eastern Seaboard, back to Chicago, to Cleveland and then eventually to Billy Berg's jazz club on Vine Street in Hollywood, where in 1946, Hoagy Carmichael heard the young unknown performing a favorite Carmichael composition, "Rocking Chair." This chance encounter led to a steady job at Billy Berg's, which in turn resulted in a recording contract with Mercury Records. On his first session he recorded a forgotten 1931 ballad entitled, "That's My Desire," and from that point on, there was just no stopping Frankie Laine.

Laine, along with Nat Cole, who preceded him by a year, marked the ascendance of the popular singer over the Big Bands, and his phenomenal success set the pattern for Johnny Ray, Tony Bennett, Elvis Presley, Tom Jones and the other musical idols who have followed. His style was thrillingly new to the audiences of the late 1940's, based as it was on his deep love of jazz and the blues.

The hit records were followed by starring roles in several motion pictures, guest appearances on numerous major radio and television shows, and his own television variety program on CBS in the mid-1950's. With a 1953 Warner Brother's production, "Blowing Wild," Laine started something different: he became the first and most successful of the singers to be identified with title songs. To date he has performed the title songs for seven motion pictures, most recently in 1974, Mel Brooks Western farce, "Blazing Saddles." On television, Laine's featured recording of "Rawhide" has become one of the most popular theme songs of all time.

Frankie's popularity quickly spread across the Atlantic, and in 1953 his stirring rendition of "I Believe" topped the British charts and stayed at number one for eighteen weeks, an unbeaten performance that even The Beatles never matched. Laine's renown continued to grow as he went to England for a record breaking engagement at the London Palladium followed by a tour of much of the rest of Europe. In later years, he added South America, Australia and the Orient to his itinerary, while continuing his unparalleled love affair with British audiences.

Laine continues to receive accolades from both professional and lay organizations for his contributions to the entertainment industry and for his humanitarian works, which are many. "All in all," he says, "I've had a happy life and a long, gratifying career in the music business, which I see continuing well into the future."

On June 12, 1996, Laine was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 27th Annual Songwriters Hall of Fame awards ceremony at the New York Sheraton. Laine, making his first New York appearance in more than 20 years, provided the night's emotional high point. He gave a performance to remember of "Cry of the Wild Goose" - his voice warm, robust and thrilling. With verve, he moved on to "That's My Desire," the haunting "We'll Be Together Again" (which he co-wrote), and the dramatic "Jezebel," bringing the audience to its feet several times. Eight of Frankie's hit songs, including "That's My Desire," "We'll Be Together Again," and "Jezebel." Touchwood Records contacted Frankie Laine after he received the Lifetime Achievement Award and has since repackaged his 1992 "Memories in Gold" album which features contemporary remakes of most of his gold-selling recordings. They call the album "Portrait of a Legend."

Artists

American Quartet
Andrews Sisters
Louis Armstrong (Satchmo)
Fred Astaire
Chet Atkins
Gene Austin (Voice of the Southland)
Gene Autry
Nora Bayes
Brook Benton
Ben Bernie
Connee Boswell
Fanny Brice
Henry Burr
Cab Calloway
Glen Campbell
Albert Campbell
Carter Family (First Family of Country Music)
Enrico Caruso
Ray Charles
Patsy Cline
Larry Clinton
Rosemary Clooney
Nat Cole (King)
Arthur Collins
Perry Como
Bing Crosby
Bob Crosby
Frank Crumit
Vic Damone
Sammy Davis Jr.
Doris Day
Tommy Dorsey
Jimmy Dorsey
Cliff Edwards
Ruth Etting
Shep Fields
Eddie Fisher
Ella Fitzgerald
Tennessee Ernie Ford
Connie Francis
Aretha Franklin (Queen of Soul)
Lefty Frizzell
Jan Garber
Judy Garland
George J. Gaskin (The Silver Voice Irish Tenor)
Marvin Gaye
Benny Goodman (King of Swing)
Glen Gray
Byron G. Harlan
Marion Harris
Charles Harrison
Haydn Quartet
Dick Haymes
Horace Heidt
Woody Herman
Billie Holiday (Lady Day)
Whitney Houston
Eddy Howard
Ink Spots
Harry James
Lewis James
Al Jolson
Ada Jones
George Jones
Sammy Kaye
Hal Kemp
Wayne King (Waltz King)
Pee Wee King
Kay Kyser
Frankie Laine
Brenda Lee
Ted Lewis
Jerry Lee Lewis (The Killer)
Guy Lombardo
Vincent Lopez
Harry MacDonough
Freddy Martin
Dean Martin
Johnny Mathis
John McCormack
Glenn Miller
Mills Brothers
Vaughn Monroe
Russ Morgan
Billy Murray (The Denver Nightingale)
J.W. Myers
Ozzie Nelson
Olivia Newton-John
George Olsen
Original Dixieland Jazz Band
Vess L. Ossman (The King of the Banjo)
Buck Owens
Patti Page
Minnie Pearl
Peerless Quartet
Peter, Paul & Mary
Elvis Presley (The King)
Ray Price
Prince's Orchestra
Dan Quinn
Leo Reisman
Paul Robeson
Roy Rogers
Linda Ronstadt
Diana Ross
Ben Selvin
Artie Shaw
Nat Shilkret
Dinah Shore
Frank Sinatra
Bessie Smith (Empress of the Blues)
Sousa's Band
Len Spencer
Dusty Springfield
Jo Stafford
Frank Stanley
Kay Starr
Cal Stewart
Barbra Streisand
The 4 Seasons
The 5th Dimension
The Byrds
The Carter Family
The Commodores
The Drifters
The Everly Brothers
The Four Tops
The Impressions
The Miracles
The Platters
The Righteous Brothers
The Spinners
The Supremes
The Temptations
Ernest Tubb (Texas Troubadour)
Sophie Tucker
Van & Schenck
Walter Van Brunt
Sarah Vaughan
Fred Waring
Dionne Warwick
Ted Weems
Kitty Wells
Paul Whiteman
Margaret Whiting
Bert Williams
Andy Williams
Teddy Wilson
Tammy Wynette